King Son Instrument Tech. Co., Ltd.

Application

Aged Coffee & Cupping Testing

Aged Coffee & Cupping Testing

What is IFP Chilling Aged Coffee?

  • Put green coffee beans in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller and aged by King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology between 0℃/32.00°F and above initial freezing point (IFP) of coffee bean, with 75% relative humidity that takes, at least 18 days, maximum 2 months, slowly to age process green coffee beans to IFP Chilling Aged Coffee beans.
  • Constant aging temperature and relative humidity: 0℃±0.3 ℃/32.00°F±0.54°, 75% RH±5%
  • Preferable Green coffee beans sources: Indonesia, Brazil and Columbia  
  • The difference between IFP Chilling aged process and Honey Coffee Process
    • Honey Coffee Process disadvantages: labor intensive, high cost, yield rate low.
    • IFP Chilling aged process advantages: One-time investment cost to purchase King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller and daily operational electrical fees.  
  • The mellow IFP Chilling Aged Coffee
    • The taste of IFP Chilling Aged Coffee is mellow, sweetness
    • King Son worldwide unique Constancy IFP Chilling Aged Technology
      • Put green coffee beans in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller and aged by King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology, where the natural amino acid in green coffee beans will be slowly aged (wakes up) that produces mouthfeel mild and mellow taste for IFP Chilling Aged Coffee, smoother to the throat with a refreshing aroma.
 
How to process IFP Chilling aged coffee beans? why?
  • IFP Chilling to age process green coffee beans
    • Step 1, Prepares (Dry/Natural/Unwashed Process, Wet/Washed Process) green coffee beans ready for aging.
    • Step 2, Puts green coffee beans in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller, and ages between 0℃±0.3 ℃/32°F±0.54°F and above freezing point of coffee by King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology, with temperature fluctuation ± 0.3°C/0.54°F and humidity fluctuation ±5% aging conditions.
    • Step 3, The green coffee beans will be aged by King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology that makes coffee taste mellow, fruity undertones, and a balanced acidity, similar to the taste which is produced by honey process coffee effect.
    • Step 4, comes the results - IFP Chilling aged coffee beans
  • IFP Chilling aged coffee beans process flow

 
 
What and how to produce Honey Process Coffee beans? and why?
 
The four principal processing methods in coffee beans
 
  • Natural or Dried in the Fruit Process – no layers are removed. The natural process, also known as the dry process, involves drying the coffee fruit whole before removing the flesh.
  • Washed Process – skin, pulp, and mucilage are removed using water and fermentation. Also called Fully Washed. This is the conventional form of Arabica coffee processing used in most parts of the world. It is possible to skip the fermentation step by using a high-tech pressure washing machine to remove the skin, pulp and some or all of the mucilage. This process is called Pulped Natural.
  • Semi-washed Process: Semi-washed reduces water consumption by traditional Wet/Washed Process method.
  • Honey Process
    • Honey processing does not involve honey. Honey Process – skin and pulp are removed, but some or all of the mucilage (Honey) remains.
    • The roasted beans that you grind and brew are only the seed of the coffee fruit.  The sticky, sugary layer beneath the skin is called the mucilage.  In honey processing the skin is removed but the mucilage is left on the seed to dry.  It is the sticky texture and the golden amber color of the mucilage reminiscent of honey that led coffee producers to name this method the honey process. 
  • 7 STEPS TO HONEY-PROCESSED COFFEE BEANS
    • Honey processed coffees are a true specialty coffee even before being expertly roasted. The green beans present sweet, fruity undertones, and a balanced acidity with depth depending on the which honey process is used. There are three levels of honey processing, black, red and yellow. The major difference is the drying time, techniques and mucilage; the higher the mucilage, the stronger the flavours.
    • Honey processing has started to gain the spotlight to differentiate specialty coffee beans. The process refers to the honey-like liquid that is produced before drying.
      • PICK RED
        • Follow a strict “pick red” only harvesting protocol of coffee berries.
      • FLOAT VERSUS SINK
        • After the berries are washed, flotation of berries is conducted to separate the floaters from the sinkers. Floater berries that have defects are discarded.
      • DE-PULP
        • All sinkers are subjected to de-pulping. What results is a wet-parchment bean―or a coffee bean covered with mucilage―a sticky substance that has a high sugar content.
      • DECIDE
        • The processor has to decide what kind of honey-processed coffee beans he wants to produce. There are three options: yellow-honey, red-honey or black-honey processed coffee beans.
      • DRY
        • This wet-parchment bean is then laid out on elevated beds for drying.
        • Yellow-honey processed bean will have 25% mucilage left on the wet-parchment bean before drying. It is allowed to dry at maximum temperature of 70⁰C/158.0°F. Stirring of the drying beans is done every six hours until desired moisture content is reached. Drying time takes approximately four to seven days.
          • Yellow Honey has the fastest drying, where the coffee receives full-sunlight giving the coffee a light-yellow colour by the time it has reached its proper finished moisture level.
          • Dry time: 8 days
          • Technique: exposed to full-sunlight while drying.
          • Flavour profile: apricot-like, light and floral.
          • Mucilage: 50%
  • Red-honey processed bean will have 50% mucilage left on the wet-parchment bean before drying. It will be dried at a maximum temperature of 50⁰C/122.0°F. Stirring of the drying beans is done every hour for the first two days and every four hours onwards, to prevent fermentation and molds until desired moisture content is reached. Drying time will range from 10 to 15 days.
    • Red Honey takes longer to dry, usually developed during cloud cover, often taking about 12 days to finish drying.
    • Dry time: 12 days
    • Technique: typically processes during cloud cover.
    • Flavour profile: sweet and syrupy.
    • Mucilage: 75%
  • Black-honey processed bean will have 100% of the mucilage left with wet-parchment bean before drying. Maximum drying temperature is 40⁰C/104.0°F. Stirring of the drying beans is done every 30 minutes for the first three days and every hour onwards to prevent fermentation and mold formation. Drying time is approximately a total of 15 to 21 days. The target moisture content to be attained is 12% to 14% MC (moist content), which is the allowable MC (moist content) for dry parchment coffee beans for storage or milling.
    • Black honey is the most complex, laborious, and expensive. This is because it takes the longest time to ferment and takes up space on the drying beds for up to twice as long compared to yellow & red honey processing.
    • Dry time: 15 days
    • Technique: covered by a black plastic tarp while turned on raised African-style beds.
    • Flavour profile: full-bodied, sweet with fruity/pulp depth.
    • Mucilage: 100%
  • DE-HULL
    • The next process is de-hulling or milling to remove the hull or parchment covering the coffee bean, followed by polishing to remove the silver skin, the final covering of the coffee bean.
  • DRY AGAIN
    • After milling, if the moisture content of the coffee bean is more than 12% MC (moist content), a final drying will be done to bring the moisture of the bean down to 12% MC (moist content), the maximum moisture allowed as per standard of the ICO for green coffee beans.
  • The advantages of Honey Process/Miel Process are to enhance coffee bean’s body richness, sweetness and reduce acidity, besides this, the aroma will be more delicate.
    • Honey processing uses less water.
    • Honey processing imparts unique flavors and aromas to the coffee.
 
IFP Chilling Aged Coffee bean vs. Honey Process Coffee bean:
By what conditions? How IFP Chilling to age green coffee beans?
The advantages of Honey Process/Miel Process are to enhance coffee bean’s body richness, mellow/sweetness and reduce acidity, besides this, the aroma will be more delicate.
  • Honey processing imparts unique flavors and aromas to the coffee.
    • Yellow Honey processed bean
      • Flavour profile: apricot-like, light and floral.
      • Mucilage: 50%
    • Red honey processed bean
      • Flavour profile: sweet and syrupy.
      • Mucilage: 75%
    • Black honey processed bean
      • is the most complex, laborious, and expensive. This is because it takes the longest time to ferment and takes up space on the drying beds for up to twice as long compared to yellow & red honey processing.
      • Flavour profile: full-bodied, sweet with fruity/pulp depth.
      • Mucilage: 100%
What Is Aged Coffee? And why?
  • In recent years, there has been a trend of aging coffee. The hype goes something like, "Aged wine is great. Aged whiskey is great. So is aged coffee!"
  • Which Types of Coffee Age Well?
    • Good candidates for aging may include low-acid coffees from India and Indonesia, especially semi-dry processed Sumatra and Sulawesi coffees. These can develop a spicy, complex flavor as they age. Also, bright/acidic wet-processed Latin American coffees do very well because they tend to mellow as they age.
  • The Coffee Aging Process
    • There are different methods for aging coffee - either holding the beans in burlap and rotating the coffee frequently as is done in Sumatra, or monsooning, where the beans are held in a warehouse and exposed to the moist monsoon winds as is done in India. Coffee can be aged 2 to 3 years. It is sought out as it can impart a specific pungency especially to espresso drinks. Aged coffee is not the same as old coffee, so it is not baggy or flat. Aged coffee will have more body, low acidity, and often strong, wild flavors. It can be an acquired taste.
    • Aged coffee is not the same as old coffee. Real aged coffee is carefully aged, usually for six months to three years. It is regularly monitored and the beans are rotated to distribute moisture and even out the aging process between coffee bags. This also prevents mold and rot from occurring.
    • One of the more recent trends is for coffee roasters to age coffee themselves. They will often use barrels like those used for aging wine and whiskey to age their coffee. This imparts a whole new range of flavors and aromas on the beans. It also allows the roasters far greater control over the roasting process.
  • The Taste
    • Good aged coffee does not taste like stale coffee. Coffee that is simply old will taste boring and flat.
    • Aged coffee has some oomph in its body without much acidity. It may or may not have some funk or "bagginess" (a burlap taste from storage). And it may be mellow and smoky, or (if it's aged in a barrel) oaky, woodsy, winey.
    • Aged coffee is to have sweet, mellow and smoky, less acidity, even out the flavor and accentuate the body of the coffee.
Preserves green coffee bean in constant temperature and humidity environment
  • Successful storage of green or parchment coffee beans can be achieved provided the initial quality of beans is good, they are well dried to 10% - 12% moisture content and the relative humidity in storage is low enough (50% - 70%) to prevent excessive moisture uptake. Maintaining the temperature below 20℃/68.00°F will further reduce coffee deterioration. Constant temperature and humidity conditions are believed to be more beneficial than widely fluctuating ones. Parchment coffee stores better than green coffee, and robusta beans store better than Arabica beans.
    • (Source:
      • Crop Post-Harvest: Science and Technology, Volume 2, Durables: Case Studies in the handling and storage of durable commodities, Chapter 2, Coffee, P. Buchli)
  • Physical Properties of Green Coffee
Worldwide unique King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology
  • IFP Chilling is the temperature range, defined between 0°C/32°F and above Initial Freezing Point (IFP) of food.
  • IFP Chilling temperature can be used to process and preserve fresh fruits, vegetables, meat and fish at a little below 0°C/32°F - but above the initial freezing point of food – without freezing/icing, gives food maximum shelf life.
  • King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology commercializes the economic value of the temperature ranges between 0°C/32°F and above Initial Freezing Point (IFP) of food, that performs temperature fluctuation ± 0.3°C/0.54°F and humidity fluctuation ± 5 % for food preservation in food industry.
  • The effects of King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology applied on the fresh food preservation mainly includes
    • King Son Constancy IFP Chilling can inhibit respiration, delay the respiratory peak and reduce the loss of nutrients. The exhaled volume of CO2 in the King Son Constancy IFP Chilling is less than that stored in normal temperature.
    • King Son Constancy IFP Chilling won’t destroy the cells, but improve the quality of fruits and vegetables in the vicinity of freezing temperature. In order to prevent from forming ice, fruits will secrete large amounts of antifreeze (its main ingredients are glucose, amino acids, aspartic acid etc.) to reduce the freezing point, or decompose the starch into sugar. These physiological changes improve the quality of fruits and vegetables in different degrees.
    • King Son Constancy IFP Chilling can inhibit the growth of microbial efficiently. Under the condition of King Son Constancy IFP Chilling, water molecules in fruits or vegetables are arranged in an orderly state, which reduce the content of free water available for the microbial. In the short and mid period preservation, King Son Constancy IFP Chilling can inhibit multiplication of microorganisms, better than the frozen temperature.
    • Since King Son Constancy IFP Chilling can inhibit chemical reaction strongly, the food quality in King Son Constancy IFP Chilling is better than that of the normal cold storage. King Son Constancy IFP Chilling also can inhibit lipid oxidation, non-enzymatic and other chemical reaction. The key for King Son Constancy IFP Chilling preservation is to realize a hibernation state of the product. The “hibernation” process is a cooling process during which the product can reduce its activity ability and energy consumption through the self-adaption, starting from the change of components within cells, and at the same time ensuring their own living life characteristics. It is a typical phenomenon of natural adaption.
  • King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology application process
    • Keep Freshness
    • Preservation
    • Aging
    • Fermentation
    • Rigor off
    • Dehydration
    • Inspissation
  • Green coffee beans aging in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller
    • Put green coffee beans in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller and aged by King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology between 0℃±0.3℃/32.00°F±0.54°F and above initial freezing point (IFP) of coffee bean, without freezing/icing, with 75%±5% relative humidity, where the natural amino acid in green coffee beans will be slowly aged (wakes up) that takes, at least 18 days, maximum 2 months, to produces mouthfeel mild and mellow taste for IFP Chilling Aged Coffee, smoother to the throat with a refreshing aroma.
  • IFP Chilling Aged Coffee Flavour profile
    • The scent contains rich fruity high notes that makes cold coffee taste delicate. Dry fragrance is more rich, mellow, sweetness and with chocolate flavor.
 
The Benefits to age green coffee beans and preserve the roasted coffee beans by King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology
  • No dry ice to freeze IFP Chilling aged coffee beans that no thawing is needed, no amino loss and no cell membrane damage in cryogenics/freezing temperature, and with real aged coffee flavor.
  • Chilled beans can offer a better grind and, consequently, a more flavourful cup of coffee that the colder the bean when ground, the finer and more uniform the result.
  • This is important because flavour extraction in coffee brewing is, in part, related to the amount of surface area of the grounds exposed to water. So, the finer the grind, the more quickly the flavour can be extracted. Also, the more uniform the ground particles are, the better and more consistent the extraction of flavour compounds. This means that the coffee needs less time to be brewed, or that you could get more coffee from the same amount of beans. It also means there are potentially less beans being discarded without being fully extracted.
  • This is good news all round. More efficient extraction is more cost-effective for businesses, and that’s good news, ultimately, for the buyer’s wallet. It’s also good news for roasters producing coffee blends as they will potentially be able to get similar extraction rates for different beans. This would lessen the chance of off tastes due to variance in particle sizes. In the bigger picture, it’s good news, too, if the reports are true about coffee production being in decline due to climate change.
 
 
King Son Constancy IFP Chilling improves coffee extraction
  • Preserved green coffee beans in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller and aged by King Son Constancy IFP Chilling Technology between 0℃±0.3℃/32.00°F±0.54°F and above initial freezing point (IFP) of coffee bean, without freezing/icing, with 75%±5% relative humidity, where the natural amino acid in green coffee beans will be slowly aged (wakes up) that produces mouthfeel mild and mellow taste IFP Chilling Aged Coffee.
  • Freezers are very arid, and the sweet, volatile oils in the beans will quickly sublimate out of the solids, making for a more bitter cup. So if you're going cryogenic, you need dry ice, not your kitchen freezer.
  • That sweet smell is the low-temperature volatiles that you lose by freezing, over-extracting, or overheating coffee. It's why specialist roasts are so fragrant and full of fruity, acidic and caramel notes.
  • Cold-brewing preserves whatever low-temperature volatiles survive roasting.
  • “From a physical chemistry perspective, the temperature dependence presents many interesting questions. Given the minimal difference between liquid nitrogen and dry ice temperatures and the reversibility of the cooling, we question whether it is possible in the future to cryogenically store roasted coffee at these temperatures. Indeed, water content in the roasted bean is of paramount importance at these temperatures, as water expansion may lead to be fracturing. Also, prolonged exposure to water can result in the solvation of flavor some molecules, thereby decreasing the lifetime of the frozen product. But if these variables were managed, there are a host of subsequent implications for the storage and relative quality assessment allowing for access to direct year-to-year comparison of crop quality. From a consumption perspective, cooling of coffee beans significantly decreases the rate of mass loss through volatile sublimation/evaporation. Thus, coffee that is ground and brewed cold could potentially demonstrate increased aroma and or flavour in the eventual brewed cup.
  • From an industrial perspective, the yield of extraction is paramount. Grinding colder coffee beans produces a more uniform particle distribution, with a decreased particle size. While the decreased particle size will tend to speed up extraction due to the larger surface area, the increased uniformity should minimise the amount of wasted bean, which is discarded without being extracted to completion. Whilst active cooling of either the coffee beans or burrs is energy consuming, the benefit of cold coffee grinding may offset this cost with more efficient extraction from the smaller particles. “
    • (Source:
      • Cryogenic freezing improves coffee extraction
      • The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee, [Erol Uman et al/Nature], page 6, Applications and Concluding Remarks
        • Sci. Rep. 6, 24483; doi: 10.1038/srep24483 (2016)
      • The Effects of Storage Temperature on the Aroma of Whole Bean Arabica Coffee Evaluated by Coffee Consumers and HS-SPME-GC-MS
The Mandheling coffee bean’s appearance differences comparison after stored in wine cooler and aged King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller 2 months respectively
 
Aged product: Mandheling green coffee bean
Aged temperature & time:
  • Non aged, stored in wine cooler, at 18℃/64.40°F for 2 months
  • Aged in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller, at 0℃±0.3 ℃/32°F±0.54°F above Initial freezing point of coffee bean for 2 months
    • Aged temperature fluctuation: ± 0.3℃/±0.54°F
    • Related humidity fluctuation: ±5%

  • King Son Constancy IFP Chilling cools the green coffee beans, that makes cold beans are the same as having cold burrs, which not only does cooling aging of green coffee beans result in a regular formation of the number of coffee particulates formed (i.e. ‘fines’) but also the aged beans are all more or less the same size.
  • After IFP Chilling aged, the aged beans decrease in acidity, and increases mellow, sweetness, and somewhat in size of bean.
  • From a consumption perspective, cooling of coffee beans significantly decreases the rate of mass loss through volatile sublimation/evaporation. Thus, coffee that is ground and brewed cold could potentially demonstrate increased aroma and or flavour in the eventual brewed cup.
  • From an industrial perspective, the yield of extraction is paramount. Grinding colder coffee beans produces a more uniform particle distribution, with a decreased particle size. While the decreased particle size will tend to speed up extraction due to the larger surface area, the increased uniformity should minimise the amount of wasted bean, which is discarded without being extracted to completion. Whilst active cooling of either the coffee beans or burrs is energy consuming, the benefit of cold coffee grinding may offset this cost with more efficient extraction from the smaller particles. “
King Son IFP Chilling aged Mandheling coffee bean that the coffee cupping testing done by instrument measurement
 
Water quality: 5 Stage Reverse Osmosis water filtering, EC (electrical conductivity) (0.01), PH (5.6), Brix% (Sweetness) (0.0)

Coffee bean species: Mandheling
  • Non-aged, stored in wine cooler, at 18℃/64.40°F for 2 months
  • Aged in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller, at 0℃±0.3 ℃/32°F±0.54°F above Initial freezing point of coffee bean for 2 months
    • Aged temperature fluctuation: ± 0.3℃/±0.54°F
    • Related humidity fluctuation: ±5%
 
Coffee cupping testing materials and method
  • Coffee powder: 6.5g
  • Water volume: 120 cc
  • Cooking water temperature: 86°C/186.8°F
  • Cooking method: by Clever Handy Brew Dripper
  • Coffee liquid temperature during measurement: 25℃/77.00°F
 
Coffee Cupping Testing measurement instrument
  • Infrared thermometer (Raytek Minitemp)
  • Sweetness meter (ATAGO PAL-1, range: 0.0 to 53.0%)
  • pH meter (EZDO PH6011) [Calibration solution PH7, PH4]
  • EC (electrical conductivity) meter (EZDO 6061) [Calibration solution EC1.41]

 
Coffee bean  Non Aged Mandheling  IFP Chilling Aged Mandheling 
EC (electrical conductivity)
TDS:Total dissolved solids
1(TDS=500ppm) 1.02(TDS=510ppm) 
PH value 5.6 5.63
Brix% (Sweetness)  0.5 0.8

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Coffee Cupping Testing Form for Mandheling that stored in wine cooler and aged in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller
Aged Coffee Bean Cupping Form 
Aged coffee bean: Mandheling Coffee cooking method: Handy Brew Clever Dripper (4 min., 6.5 g coffee powder,  water 200 cc, water temperature 80 °C/176.0°F)
Cup quality criteria Grading Aged in wine Cooler  Aged in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller
Dry Fragrance The text depicts the flavor,
Bold (body/strength, rich) and
aromatic: 1 - 10 points
The scent is deep, richer and aromatic with
more smokey (smoked wood) and burnt smell
Bold (rich) and aromatic: 2
The scent contains less smokey (smoked wood ) and burnt smell, but contains more chocolate flavor and fruit sweetness that appear more obvious in the scent
Bold (rich) and aromatic: 6
 
Wet Aroma The text depicts the flavor,
Bold (body/strength, rich) and
aromatic: 1 - 10 points
Wet aroma contains more smoked wood flavor
Bold (rich) and aromatic: 2
Wet aroma contains more  smoked wood flavor, the scent is lighter
Bold (rich) and aromatic: 1
Hot Flavor The text depicts the flavor,
Bold (body/strength, rich) and
aromatic: 1 - 10 points
The scent is lighter, the tase is smoother
Bold (rich) and aromatic: 5
The scent contains terrific fruity high notes
Bold (rich) and aromatic: 4
Cold Favor The text depicts the flavor,
Bold (body/strength, rich) and
aromatic: 1 - 10 points
it's more astringent
Bold (rich) and aromatic: 6
Tastes smooth
Bold (rich) and aromatic: 5
Clean Cup 1 - 10 points 2 6
Mouthfeel The text depicts the flavor Mild and lighter Lighter, enhanced 
Oral touch The text depicts the flavor Fair Smoother
Acidity 1. Very light, 2. Yes, but not obvious, 3. Moderate and soft, 4. Obvious and prominent, 5. Extremely thick 3 1
Bitterness 1. Very light, 2. Yes, but not obvious, 3. Moderate and soft, 4. Obvious and prominent, 5. Extremely thick 4 2
Mellow/
Sweetness
1. Very light, 2. Yes, but not obvious, 3. Moderate and soft, 4. Obvious and prominent, 5. Extremely thick 1 4
Balance 1 - 10 points 2 8
Overall 1 - 10 points 5 8
Note   lighter flavor with  richer Dry Fragrance and
mouthfeel is mild, not smooth as aging coffee has.
The scent contains rich fruity high notes that makes cold coffee taste delicate. Dry fragrance is more rich, mellow, sweetness and with chocolate flavor.

 
 

























































King Son IFP Chilling aging Brazil Ipanema Estate coffee bean that the coffee cupping testing done by instrument measurement
 
Water quality: 5 Stage Reverse Osmosis water filtering, EC (electrical conductivity) (0.01), PH (5.6), Brix% (Sweetness) (0.0)
 
Coffee bean species: Brazil Ipanema Estate

  • Non-aged, stored in wine cooler, at 18℃/64.40°F for 2 months
  • Aged in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller, at 0℃±0.3 ℃/32°F±0.54°F above Initial freezing point of coffee bean for 2 months
    • Aged temperature fluctuation: ± 0.3℃/±0.54°F
    • Related humidity fluctuation: ±5%
 
Coffee cupping testing materials and method
  • Coffee powder: 6.5g
  • Water volume: 120 cc
  • Cooking water temperature: 86°C/186.8°F
  • Cooking method: by Clever Handy Brew Dripper
  • Coffee liquid temperature during measurement: 25℃/77.00°F
 
Coffee Cupping Testing measurement instrument
  • Infrared thermometer (Raytek Minitemp)
  • Sweetness meter (ATAGO PAL-1, range: 0.0 to 53.0%)
  • pH meter (EZDO PH6011) [Calibration solution PH7, PH4]
  • EC (electrical conductivity) meter (EZDO 6061) [Calibration solution EC1.41]

 
  Non-aged,
stored in wine cooler
Mesh Bag, aged by IFP Chilling process
Linen sack,
aged in IFP Chilling process
EC (electrical conductivity) EC=1.9 EC=2.13 EC=2.01
TDS(Total dissolved solids) TDS=950ppm TDS=1050ppm TDS=1000ppm 
PH  value 5.62 5.58 5.43
Brix% (Sweetness) 1.7 2 2.3


 







King Son IFP Chilling aging Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Banko Gotiti coffee bean that the coffee cupping testing done by instrument measurement
 
Water quality: 5 Stage Reverse Osmosis water filtering, EC (electrical conductivity) (0.01), PH (5.6), Brix% (Sweetness) (0.0)

Coffee bean species: Ethiopia Natural Yirgacheffe Banko Gotiti
  • Non-aged, stored in wine cooler, at 18℃/64.40°F for 2 months
  • Aged in King Son Convertible IFP Aging Chiller, at 0℃±0.3 ℃/32°F±0.54°F above Initial freezing point of coffee bean for 2 months
    • Aged temperature fluctuation: ± 0.3℃/±0.54°F
    • Related humidity fluctuation: ±5%
 
Coffee Cupping Testing materials and method
• Coffee powder: 10g
• Water volume: 180 cc
• Cooking water temperature: 86°C/186.8°F
• Cooking method: by Clever Handy Brew Dripper,4 min.
• Coffee liquid temperature during measurement: 25℃/77.00°F
 
Coffee Cupping Testing measurement instrument
• Infrared thermometer (Raytek Minitemp)
• Sweetness meter (ATAGO PAL-1, range: 0.0 to 53.0%)
• pH meter (EZDO PH6011) [Calibration solution PH7, PH4]
• EC (electrical conductivity) meter (EZDO 6061) [Calibration solution EC1.41]


 
  Stored in wine cooler, 1st crack finishes Aged in King Son IFP
Convertible Aging Chiller, 1st crack finishes
Stored in wine cooler, 1st crack under way  Aged in King Son IFP
Convertible Aging Chiller,
1st crack under way 
Stored in wine cooler,
on the verge of second crack
Aged in King Son IFP
Convertible Aging Chiller,
on the verge of second crack
EC (electrical conductivity) EC=1.93 EC=1.63 EC=2.0 EC=2.02 EC=2.03 EC=1.88
TDS(Total dissolved solids) TDS=965ppm TDS=815ppm TDS=1000ppm TDS=1010ppm TDS=1015ppm TDS=940ppm
PH value 5.14 5.11 5.1 4.95 5.27 5.33
Brix% (Sweetness) 1.1 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.2
Mouthfeel       The worst   The best 















 
 
Fast Timor Turiscai 1800m coffee bean that the coffee cupping testing done by instrument measurement
 
Water quality: 5 Stage Reverse Osmosis water filtering, EC (electrical conductivity) (0.01), PH (5.6), Brix% (Sweetness) (0.0)
 
Coffee bean species: Fast Timor Turiscai 1800m
 
Coffee Cupping Testing method
  • Coffee liquid temperature during measurement: 25℃/77.00°F
 
Coffee Cupping Testing measurement instrument
  • Infrared thermometer (Raytek Minitemp)
  • Sweetness meter (ATAGO PAL-1, range: 0.0 to 53.0%)
  • pH meter (EZDO PH6011) [Calibration solution PH7, PH4]
  • EC (electrical conductivity) meter (EZDO 6061) [Calibration solution EC1.41]

 
Cooking Method  Clever Handy Brew Dripper Clever Handy Brew Dripper Clever Handy Brew Dripper Clever Handy Brew Dripper Grind & Brew
Coffee Maker
Grind & Brew
Coffee Maker
Water Temperature 86℃ (186.8°F) 86℃ (186.8°F) 92 ℃ (197.6°F) 92 ℃ (197.6°F) 85 ℃ (185.0°F) 85 ℃ (185.0°F)
Coffee-to-Water Ratio 01:18 01:18 01:18 01:18 01:30 01:18
Brewing Time 3 min. 4 min. 3 min. 4 min. Brewing by steam,which is produced by the spout  Brewing by steam,which is produced by the spout 
Graduation Index
(Tiamo Coffee Grinder) 
3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5
EC (electrical conductivity) EC=2.6 EC=1.5 EC=2.61 EC=2.65 EC= EC=1.94
TDS (Total dissolved solids) TDS=1300ppm TDS=750ppm  TDS=1350ppm TDS=1550ppm TDS=ppm  TDS=952ppm
PH value 5.35 5.27 5.3 5.3 5.34 5.28
Brix% (Sweetness)  2.8 2.7 2.8 2.7 1.1 1.1
Mouthfeel 6 1 2 3 4 5
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